Trauma Recovery & Boundaries

When addressing a traumatic event in your life that has been a secret, avoided or too terrifying to confront, there are some essential elements to consider to help yourself feel safe. Vulnerability, boundaries, and empowerment are crucial when you have been abused. This posting relates to all person's that have been violated in some way. Sharon Martin, LCSW developed the list on the right to provide guidance for developing healthy boundaries. When sexual, physical or verbal abuse happens at an early age, there is no chance to protect yourself or even understand that it is a violation, which is NOT YOUR FAULT. Your recovery and sense of power to take control of yourself, relationships and emotions depends empowering your thoughts, actions and choices to protect yourself, create a sense of safety, and trust your instincts when your gut tells you "danger." As a child, you were violated, which made you confused, fearful and damaged your ability to trust, feel safe or protected. Taking your power back means saying no, recognizing your limits and dealing with personal safety. To survive any trauma, the mind has means to dissociate from the experience, however, this causes problems over time when you want to connect intimately with someone else. To recover from abuse, there are some essential elements to enhance resiliency:
  • Safety
  • Trust
  • Choice
  • Empowerment
  • Authenticity
  • Re-connection to your body, emotions, sexuality and physical touch
Psychotherapy helps make you feel whole again with intimate relationships. You don't have to live life avoiding your past and fears. Trauma recovery is possible with support, at a pace and place that is safe and manageable. Your instincts will guide you on who to trust and what is working to help free you up from fear and the past. Trauma Informed Care has a resource guide.  This is a trauma cycle showing an internal dialogue and feeling that accompany betrayal. 

This link will get you to it. Trauma Informed Care Resources

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