Six Essential Principles Necessary for Recovery to Take Hold


This book by Shumway and Kimball provide some key elements for lasting recovery. I have highlighted some of their main premises. Take a few moments to consider addiction in your life, a family member, a friend or loved one and see what might apply. In their book, they state,
“First, we recognize the problems we have as adults that were caused by growing up in a dysfunctional family. 
Second, we learn how to recover from the unresolved pain that was caused by growing up in a dysfunctional family. 
Finally, we learn how to solve current problems in spite of the obstacles caused by how we were raised.”

The disease of addiction touches everyone in profound and personal ways. The individual, familial, and societal costs are staggering and are clearly understood by those who have been touched by this disease. The following three categories describe how addiction is represented in your life:

1. You are an alcoholic/addict--or think you might be.
2. You love an addict in your role as a family member, significant other, or close friend.
3. You are a professional in the addiction/recovery field.
No matter which category you identify with, you have been affected by addiction and the far-reaching pain and consequences that result.

In an effort to help yourself and others, these authors have identified six principles to aid in the ongoing appraisal of what they describe as a "recovery walk." These principles include:

1. Hope
The reawakening after despair; to expect with greater confidence.

2. Healthy Coping Skills
The development of effective skills to manage the pain and stress of life.

3. Achievement and Accomplishment
The movement beyond the limitations of addiction toward personal achievement.

4. Capacity for Meaningful Relationships
The positive support and connection with family and peers.

5. Unique Identity Development
The emergence of a unique and positive identity.

6. Reclamation of Agency
The internal feeling that you have choices in your behavior—including the choice not to use.   

Sports Psychology--Mastering the Inner Mental Game


Don't give up!!!!! If you are an athlete and you are having performance problems, there are tools and techniques developed in sports psychology to overcome mental blocks.

Mental blocks or barriers include high expectations, perfectionism, fear of failure, lack of emotional control and attentional focus. Athletes can overcome these barriers through sport psychology intervention that aim to enhance confidence, focus, composure, trust and mental preparation. Mental barriers include high expectations, perfectionism, fear of failure, lack of emotional control and attentional focus. Athletes can overcome these barriers through sport psychology intervention that aim to enhance confidence, focus, composure, trust and mental preparation.

As an elite athlete, you will need to know how to master the inner mental game to become a champion. Working with the psychological aspects of sport in conjunction with physical training gives athletes an edge to enhance your athletic talents without interference from doubts, fear, and stress and performance anxiety. Excessive anxiety can detract from performance, as a momentary lapse in attention and focus. Competition can be transformed into growth experiences and learning experiences to challenge and enhance performance. To become a champion, you have to think like a champion. There are specific techniques and skills available that provide the winning edge! 

Psychological states can influence the physiology and behavioral response to exercise. Through mental training, you can learn to increase effectiveness, skill development, concentration, and motivation by integrating mind and body. These techniques help develop the motivation, habits, confidence and attitudes for the making of a champion.  

Once an assessment is completed, a plan will be created to enhance athletic performance.  The mental training plan will includes:
  •       Cognitive retraining
  •       Individual counseling for each athlete.
  •       Assessment of personality, anxiety, and mood states.
  •       Stress management and relaxation training.
  •       Practice and supervision of all techniques listed in this manual.
  •       Strategy development.
  •       Identification of specific training and competition goals
  •       Mental rehearsal & imagery training.